Here are basic guidelines for recruiting in college baseball at all divisions.

Division I: 

The typical Division I baseball player is ‘polished’ and already has all the tools necessary to be successful as a freshman. As opposed to the Division II baseball player, the typical DI player needs far less development, if any. The position players possess at least 4 of the 5 measurable tools – hit for average, hit for power, arm strength, speed, and defensive abilities. The pitchers display a command of at least 3 pitches with high velocities. On average, they have the ability to throw many innings, and most often they are only used on the mound and rarely as position players. Most D1 players come from large high schools. Many of these programs are considered the best in their area or in the state. In addition, most DI players have been awarded accolades such as All-Area, All-County, or All-State. 

The average characteristics by position are as follows: 

Right Handed Pitchers:
-Height: 6’1”
-Weight: 180 lbs.
-Over 1 K per Inning Pitched
-ERA below 2.50
-Velocity: 88-90 MPH (Verified by neutral source) 

Left Handed Pitchers:
-Height: 6’1”
-Weight: 180 lbs.
-1 K per Inning Pitched
-ERA below 2.50
-Velocity: 85-87 MPH (Verified by neutral source)  

Outfielders:
-Height: 5’11”
-Weight: 170 lbs.
-60 Yard Dash: 6.6 (Verified)
-Velocity for OF: 86-87 MPH (Verified by neutral source) 

Middle Infielders:
-Height: 5’11”
-Weight: 175 lbs.
-60 Yard Dash: 6.8-6.9 (Verified)
-Velocity from INF: 85+ MPH (Verified by neutral source) 

Catchers:
-Height: 5’10”-6’0”
-Weight: 180 lbs.
-Pop Time: Sub 1.95 (Verified by neutral source*)* 

Corner Infielders:
-Height: 6’2”
-Weight: 200 lbs.
-Power Numbers: 8+ HR, 30+RBI 

Division II: 

For some colleges, especially those in the southern states and out on the West Coast, DII Baseball is an extension of DI. There are very few differences between the typical West Coast or southern DII player and the average DI player. For the DII schools up north, the athletes may be a notch below the average DI and perhaps a little less polished. They may not throw as hard, play for the top high schools programs, or possess at least 4 of the 5 measurable tools. This is not always the case, as there are some very solid DII Baseball Programs up north. However, it is no secret that overall, the better baseball schools are those located in warmer climates. 

The Minimum Requirements by position are as follows: 

Right Handed Pitchers:
-Height: 6’0′ (Preferably taller)
-Weight: 175 lbs.
-Averaging about 1K per inning pitched
-ERA below 3.00
-Velocity: 85 MPH 

Left Handed Pitchers:
-Height: 5’10′ (Preferably taller)
-Weight: 165 lbs.
-Averaging about 1K per inning pitched
-ERA at 3.00 or below
-Velocity: 83 MPH 

Outfielders:
-Height: 5’10″
-Weight: 165 lbs.
-60 Yard Dash: 6.8 or below
-Velocity from the OF: 82-86 MPH 

Middle Infielders:
-Height: 5’9″
-Weight: 165 lbs.
-60 Yard Dash: 6.9 or below
-Velocity from the INF: Low 80′s MPH from SS 

Catchers:
-Height: 5’10″
-Weight: 180 lbs.
-Pop Time: 2.0 or below 

Corner Infielders:
-Height: 6’0″
-Weight: 180 lbs.
-Power Numbers: 4+ HR, 20+ RBI 

Much can be determined on film. It is very difficult to measure defensive abilities on paper. Fielding percentage cannot be used as an accurate statistic because it is difficult to calculate and it can be easily manipulated. Most Division II players have received several accolades, such as All-Conference or All-Area. 

Division III: 

Some DIII programs are stronger than others, but there seems to be more continuity with the physical characteristics of DIII players than there are for DII or NAIA. Certain DIII programs, such as Wisconsin Whitewater or George Fox, play at a superior level. However, for the most part, the range of physical characteristics was slim.  

The Minimum Requirements by positions are as follow: 

Right Handed Pitchers:
-Height: 5’9”
-Weight: 160 lbs.
-1 or less than 1 K Per Inning Pitched
-ERA below 4.00
-Velocity: 81 MPH 

Left Handed Pitchers:
-Height: 5’9”
-Weight: 160 lbs.
-1 or less than 1 K Per Inning Pitched
-ERA below 4.00
-Velocity: 79 MPH 

Outfielders:
-Height 5’8”
-Weight: 160 lbs.
-60 Yard Dash: 7.0 or below
-Velocity from the OF: 78+ MPH 

Middle Infielders:
-Height: 5’8”
-Weight: 150 lbs.
-60 Yard Dash: 7.1 or below
-Velocity from the INF: Upper 70′s MPH from SS 

Catchers:
-Height: 5’9”
-Weight: 165 lbs.
-Pop Time: 2.1 or below 

Corner Infielders:
-Height: 5’10″
-Weight: 170 lbs.
-Power Numbers: 2+ HR, 20+ RBI 

NAIA: 

The discrepancies in characteristics are very severe when it comes to NAIA baseball. Some NAIA schools are playing at a DII level, while others are competing at a lower DIII level. NCSA found a mix of D2 criteria and D3 criteria make up the recruiting guidelines for this league.  

Junior College Baseball: 

Unlike NAIA, junior colleges do have 3 divisions for the purpose of separating stronger JC programs from the weaker ones. While there may be somewhat of a drop off in talent between Division III junior college and Division I and Division II junior colleges, there is little difference between DI and DII junior colleges. Many of the junior college players lack the ‘polish’ to be considered DI players coming out of HS, but they already possess the necessary physical tools to be successful at the DI level. All they need to do is harness and polish those skills. The GPA’s of most of the junior college athletes are lower than those attending 4 year schools, suggesting that these athletes need to two years to mature academically as well.  

 

Preferred Grades for All Divisions:
3.0 GPA +24 ACT + 1000 SAT (out of 1600)
(No scores needed for underclassmen) 

In order to compile these Recruiting Guidelines, NCSA tracked hundreds of former NCSA student-athletes who have gone on to compete at the collegiate level, polled college coaches across the nation, and analyzed college rosters at all levels of competition. 

Baseball by the Numbers

Schools Offering Baseball
NCAA Division I 300
NCAA Division II 242
NCAA Division III 376
NAIA 209
Junior College 400
Total 1,527
Athletic Scholarship Opportunities
Division I (per school) 11.7
Division II (per school) 9
NAIA (per school) 12
NJCAA (*varies per school) 24
Student-Athlete Participation
NCAA Division I 9,710
NCAA Division II 8,412
NCAA Division III 11,694
NAIA 5,411
Junior College 10,950
HS Student-Athletes 472,644
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